James Witt (1820-1900?) Campbell, Bedford County, VA

 

1820

JAMES (JOHN) WITT born (according to 1850 census) to JOHN  WITT

(According the record of his first marriage in 1836, the parents of JAMES WITT are listed as JOHN WITT.)

1836

17 August

JAMES WITT, son of JOHN WITT,  married Saluda Ann (Rudy) Crouch. duaghter of Joseph Croucborn.h. (Source: Quaker Encyclopedia, pa. 1018 if Bedfird Marriage Bonds. Josiah Crouch, surety)

.1838

Edwin J. Witt, son of JAMES JOHN WITT and Saluda Ann Crouch,

1842

Jan. 10, 1842

Bedford County Quaker Marriage Bonds:

JAMES WITT & LUCY ANN NEWMAN; David H. Creasey, Surety;
Consent of Margaret Wilks, guardian for Lucy Ann. Married by Rev. William Leftwich.

[WHB – Although some “family trees” identify other persons as James Witt’s wife, this Bedford County marriage bond, is the one that most convinces me. The circumstances of Lucy Ann Newman’s status as orphan, with Margaret Wilks as her guardian, need to be discovered, but Witt, Newman, Creasy and Wilks all appear to be part of Rev. Leftwich’s Baptist community.]

1844

Ann Witt, daughter of JAMES WITT and LUCY ANN NEWMAN, born. [Ann Witt reported as 10 in 1860 census, probably meant to be 16.]

1846

Aurilia Witt, daughter of JAMES WITT and LUCY ANN NEWMAN, born.

1847

James M. Witt, son of JAMES WITT and LUCY ANN NEWMAN, born.

1848

MALINDA JANE WITT, daughter of JAMES WITT and LUCY ANN NEWMAN, born.

[WHB – I think 1848 is probably the right birthyear. Assuming MALINDA JANE was 12 in 1860, as reported in the 1860 census (and 22 in 1870 and 32 in 1880), she would have been 17 or older when married, rather than 14 or 15 if the 1850 0r 1851 birthyears, calculated by assuming her age was 38 on her death record.]

1850

1850 census

JAMES WITT, Carpenter, AGE 30; WIFE LUCY A AGE 24; Edwin  (son of JAMES WITT and Saluda Crouch) 12, Ann M 6, Aurilia C, 4; JANE M, 3; Angeline 1. Living with them is William Cadwallader, 24, carpenter; James Bogart/?Hogart?

1860

MALINDA JANE WITT in 1860 Census as age 12, Western District, Campbell, Virginia, Castle Craig Post Office.

Family Number 282. Others listed JAMES WITT (m, 40,), LUCY A[NN] WITT (f, 35) Ann Witt (f, 10), Madison Overstreet (m, 25), M D Fuller (m 51, millwright). All born Virginia

[WHB – The presence of Madison Overstreet in the household of JAMES WITT suggests descendency from the Witt-Overstreet marriage of a previous generation.]

WHB-Note family 281 is Benjamin Witt (m, 34, carpenter), Francis V Witt (f, 30), Ann E Witt (f, 13) and Mary F (f, 4) All born Virginia. Family 283 is Edwin (I or J) Witt, (m, 22, carpenter), Mary A Witt (17, f) and Baby (m,  1/12 mo).

[WHB – Note from Campbell Chronicles and Family Sketches, Embraching the History of Campbell County, Virginia 1782-1926, by R. H. EARLY; J. P. Bell Company, Lynchburg, VA, 1927.

Small Towns and Villages Chapter IV

“Castle Craig The settlement at Castle Craig is situated about eight miles from Evington,seven miles from Alta Vista, a mile or more from Lynch/s old tavern and two miles from Kingston, on Ward’s Road: it is said to have been given its name by an English woman after a place in England. It possesses a store, a church, post office, several homes and the now (ever present) gasoline station.”

1865

MALINDA JANE WITT married to JOSEPH BURNETT, JR, of Bedford County, VA, son of JOSEPH BURNETT SR and ELIZABETH JOHNSON.

1866?

LUCY ANN WITT, daughter of JAMES WITT and LUCY ANN NEWMAN(?) born?

Death of LUCY ANN NEWMAN????

1870

From p. 224 of 1870 census Schedule 1 – Inhabitants in the Western Division, in the County of Campbell, of Virginia, enumberated by me on the 21st day of October, 1870, Post Office: Lynchburg, VA. J M Woods, Ass’t Marshall:

1520/1619 JAMES WITT, age 52, Male White, Carpenter; Elizabeth Witt, age 35, F W, Keeping House; Lucy Ann, age 4, At Home; Ann M. Talbot, age 31, F W, no occupation, Abner Talbot, age 4, M W, at home: Amelia Arnold, age 17, Female Black, Domestic Servant.]

Living next door (1519/1616) is JOSEPH BURNETT, age 28, M W, Stone Mason; J[ANE] M[ALINDA], age 22,  F W, Keeping Home; Ida M, age 3, at home; C[LARA] BELL, age 10/12, F W, at home.

Living next door to JOSEPH at 1578/1616 is Jno? D Antony, age 28, M W, Clerk in Store; Henry R. Witt, age 48, M W , carpeter [value of property 150] Nancy R , age 45 F W, Keeping house; Alonzo W, 18 M W, works on farm; H? C?, age 12, M W, at School; Wm H, age 10, M W, at School.

1889

Daughter MALINDA JANE WITT dead at age 41.

1900?

[WHB – Although one sees the 1900 death date (even March 5, 1900) for JAMES WITT, I am not yet persuaded that there is credible evidence to support this date.]

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Malinda Jane Witt (1848-1889), Bedford County, VA

1848?-1850? 

[WHB – I think 1848 is probably the right birthyear. Assuming MALINDA JANE was 12 in 1860, as reported in the 1860 census (and 22 in 1870 and 32 in 1880), she would have been 17 or older when married, rather than 14 or 15 if the 1850 0r 1851 birthyears, calculated by assuming her age was 38 on her death record.]

MALINDA JANE WITT, daughter of JAMES WITT and LUCY ANN NEWMAN, born.

1860

MALINDA JANE WITT in 1860 Census as age 12, Western District, Campbell, Virginia, Castle Craig Post Office.

Family Number 282. Others listed JAMES WITT (m, 40,), LUCY A{NN] WITT (f, 35) Ann Witt (f, 10), Madison Overstreet (m, 25), M D Fuller (m 51, millwright). All born Virginia

WHB-Note family 281 is Benjamin Witt (m, 34, carpenter), Francisc V Witt (f, 30), Ann E Witt (f, 13) and Mary F (f, 4) All born Virginia. Family 283 is Edwin (I or J) Witt, (m, 22, carpenter), Mary A Witt (17, f) and Baby (m,  1/12 mo).

[WHB – Note from Campbell Chrnicles and Family Sketches, Embraching the History of Caampbell County, Virginia 1782-1926, by R. H. EARLY; J. P. Bell Company, Lynchburg, VA, 1927.

Small Towns and Villages Chapter IV

“Castle Craig The settlement at Castle Craig is situated about eight miles from Evington,seven miles from Alta Vista, a mile or more from Lynch/s old tavern and two miles from Kingston, on Ward’s Road: it is said to have been given its name by an English woman after a place in England. It possesses a store, a church, post office, several homes and the now (ever present) gasoline station.”

1865

MALINDA JANE WITT married to JOSEPH BURNETT, JR, of Bedford County, VA, son of JOSEPH BURNETT SR and ELIZABETH JOHNSON.

[WHB  – I have not yet seen a public or church record of this marriage, although it may be that “record-keeping business as usual” might have been disrupted by the Civil War. It has been pointed out to me that so far no document clearly associates the “Jane Malinda” and “Malinda J” Burnett of the 1870 and 1880 census with the “Malinda Jane Witt” of the 1860 census in John Witt’s household.

On the other hand, she had many children and from them many living descendents who identify JOSEPH BURNETT’s wife as MALINDA JANE WITT. I myself have known some of the family elders whose family histories so identify her.

I, myself, am reasonably certain that JOHN WITT is the father in law of JOSEPH BURNETT, and await convincing documentation of that supposed fact.]

1867 

February 16, 1867

JOSEPH BURNETT JR married MALINDA JANE WITT, in Campbell County, VA [Source: Justin Crawford.]

September 21, 1867

Ida M. Burnett, daughter of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born  [WHB – married George K. Hogan]  Source: Personal letter from Mrs George W. [Phyllis] Martin, a direct descendent.

1870

October 21, 1870

Census enumeration, for Western District, Campbell County, Lynchburg Post Office.

1519/1616 JOSEPH BURNETT (29, m, stone mason, real estate value 200) J[ANE] M[ALINDA] (22, f, keeping home), Ida M (3, f, at home), C[LARA] BELL (10/12, f, at home), Delice? Brooks, (14, f, w, domestic servant)

1520/1614 James Witt (52, m, carpenter) Elizabeth Witt (35, f, keeping home), Lucy Ann Witt (4, f, at home), Ann M Talbot (31, f, 2, no occupation), Abner Talbot (4, m, at home); 1520/1615 is Herny L Witt (48, m, carpenter), Nancy R Witt (45, f, keeping home), Alonzo W Witt (18, m, works on farm), Rowena D Witt (14, f, no occupation) , H? O? (12, m, at school), Wm H(?) 10, m, w, at school)

December 6, 1870

Otey Munford Burnett, son of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT born , died 1948. Source: Personal letter from Mrs George W. [Phyllis] Martin, a direct descendent.

1872

June 18, 1872

Henry Clay Burnett, son of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT,  born . born.

1874

March 7, 1874

Lillian B. Burnett, daughter of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born

1875

December 1, 1875

Myrtle D. Burnett, daughter of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born

1878

April 18, 1878

William Penn Burnett, son of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born

1880

1880 census

Staunton Magisterial District, Bedford County, VA

240/240 JOSEPH BURNETT, JR (38, m, farm laborer), MALINDA J[ANE WITT] BURNETT (32, f, wife, keeping house), Ida M (12, daughter, at home), CLARA B[ELLE] BURNETT (10, f, at home). Otey M Burnett (9, son, at ?), Henry C. Burnett (7, m, son), Lilly B [6, f, daughter), Myrtle D Burnett (4, f, daughter), William Penn Burnett, (2, m, son), Olley P (1/12, f, daughter).

[WHB – Ollie P, born 1880, died 1880, age 3 months]

1881

Otha T. Burnett, daughter of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born.

1883

August 9, 1883

Linwood B. Burnett, son of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born.

1884

Otha T. Burnett died of burns at age 3.

1885

[WHB] Lewis V. Burnett, son of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born.

1887

[WHB] Harold Carlton Burnett son of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born.

1888

September 23, 1888

Hattie Ward Burnett, daughter of JOSEPH BURNETT JR and MALINDA JANE WITT, born.

1889

MALINDA JANE WITT died at age 41.

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Saunders in Gloucestershire and Bristol in Late Medieval Times

WHB – One finds speculative family histories of the Saunders surname which have excerpted information from older works uncritically.

That said, there is evidence of persons surnamed Saunders located in earlier centuries in communities in which persons of that surname are centered in the 16th and later centuries.

I suggest that it is useful to organize information published in these older works in ways that might give us insight into whether there is a direct link between the older and later references to Saunders-surnamed persons in specific geographical areas.

The following items record persons surnamed Saunders in Late Medieval Bristol (a port city on the Southwestern coast of England, at times part of Gloucestershire and otherwise adjacent and historically associated with that county):

Quotations from Historical Society of West Wales Transactions Volume II, 1913, pages 161-188 (929.3429 international classification code): Saunders of Pentre, Tymawr, and Glanrhydw by Francis Green.

“But to return to the Saunders of Charlwood [WHB – County of Surrey, near the border with the County of Sussex in Southeast England].

“According to the Harleian M.S., No. 1433, the earliest known member of the family was James Saunders, who had a son Mathew Saunders, the latter having issue, Stephen Saunders.

“This Stephen Saunders had a son, called Thomas Saunders, whose wife’s name is said to be Johanna or Joan.

“It is possible that this is the Thomas Saunders, whom John Payn, the King’s [i. e., King Henry IV] chief butler, appointed as his deputy in the port of Bristol, and to whom a writ of aid was issued on 5 Feb., 1400 (Patent Rolls).

“The same Thomas Saunders was appointed in 1404 to the office of gauger of wines at the port of Bristol and other places adjacent, and it is evident that he had secured the favour of the King, as it is stated that he was not to be removed from that office without the King’s special command. This office was confirmed to him in 1423, and he was then described as Thomas Saunders of Bristol, King’s serjeant (Patent Rolls).

[WHB – Note this confirmation occurred in the first year of the Regency Council appointed for the infant King Henry VI. This might be worth further inquiry.]

“The fact that he was described as of Bristol suggests that he lived there, and it may be contented that the owner of Charlwood would scarcely have left his considerable estate to reside in Bristol to attend to his office there. It may, however, be that the description in question was intended merely to refer to the locality of the office, and it must be remembered that many offices were in those days often sinecures and were performed by deputies and sub-deputies. The Harleian M.S., No 1397, in the British Museum, states that the following inscription was to be seen on the church porch of Charlewood in 1622:-

Orate pro anima Thos. Sand. et Joha’ nxoris ejus et pro animabus omnium fidelium defunctorum.

“This inscription, unfortunately, does not seem to have borne any date, but it evidently records the death of Thomas Saunders of Charlwood and his wife Joan.

“From the marriage of Thomas Saunders of Charlewood and his wife Joan there was a son William Saunders, who married Joan, the daughter of Thomas Carew of Bedington. This William Saunders died on 10 Aug., 1481, and his wife Joan in 1470, as appears by a brass formerly on a tombstone at Charlwood, bearing this inscription, which has fortunately been copied in the Harleian MS., No. 1397:-

Orate pro animabus Will’i Saunder generos’ qui ob’ 10 die mensis Augusti A.D. Mill’o CCCCLXXXI et Joha’ nx’ ejus qu’e6 ob’ … die mensis …. A`. 1470, quor’ a’iabus p’pl’cietur Deus. Amen.

“Another inscription preserved in the same MS. records the death of John Saunders, probably a son or brother of William Saunders. It reads:-

Hic jacet magist’ Joh’es Saunder qui ob’ 3 die Febr. A. D. 1477

“William Saunders was possibly the person whom the Patent Rolls mention as having been on 1 July, 1473, appointed one of the deputies at the port of Southampton, of Anthony. Earl Riveres, chief butler of England. From the marriage of William Saunders with his wife Joan there were the following children:-

1. Richard Saunders, who inherited Charlwood and married Agnes, by whom he had a son Nicholas, whose descendants held the Charlwood estate till the 17th century. Richard Saunders died in 1480, and his wife Agnes on 7 Jan., 1486, as appears by a copy of an inscription at Charlwood Church, preserved in the Harleian MS., No. 1397.

“In addition to Nicholas, Richard Saunders had two sons, William and James; James, who was the third son, died on 19 Feb., 1511 (Harleian MS., No. 1397); Nicholas, the son of Richard Saunders, died on 29 Aug., 1553; he married Alice, the daughter of John Hungate of York, and their son Thomas Saunders, afterwards Sir Thomas Saunders, knt., was King’s Remembrancer of the Exchequer. Nicholas and his wife Alice were buried at Charlwood Church, where there still remains an interesting brass to their memory (see illustration), bearing this inscription:-

Here is buryed Nicholas Saunder Esquyer, and Alys his wife, daughter of John Hungate of the Countey of Yorke Esquyer, ffather and mother to Thomas Saunder Knyght, ye King’s Remembrance of thexcheker whiche Nicholas deceased the xxix day of August ye firste yere of ye reigne of quene Mary A’MV’LIII.

“In Charlwood Church there is at the present time a fine old oak screen on which are carved in several places the initials ‘R.S.’ Tradition says that this screen was presented by one of the Saunders, and in all probability the donor was Richard Saunders, who dies in 1480. In the same church hangs an ancient helmet, which is said to have been worn by one of the family at the Crusades.”

[WHB – There appear to be several possibilities: 1) that the Thomas Saunders of Charlwood and the Thomas Saunders appointed to the post in Bristol as an agent of King Henry IV (Bolingbroke) were two different, unrelated persons, 2) that Thomas of Charlwood and Thomas of Bristol were the same person, who: 2a) retained interests in both Charlwood and Bristol that were inherited by descendents located in both regions, or 2b) held the post in Bristol temporarily but left no descendents in that region.

Note that option 2a would explain the presence of families in both regions in later centuries, but further evidence is needed.]

_________________

From the Victoria County History, A History of the County of Surrey, volume 3 , H. E. Maiden, editor, 1911:

“The Sanders or Sander family of Charlwood were, if not Catholic recusants themselves, closely allied by marriage and sympathies with recusants. Nicholas Sander the famous controversialist was of a younger branch of the family, and his sister, who married John Pitts of Oxfordshire, was mother of John Pitsaeus, Dean of Liverdun in Lorraine and Bishop of Verdun. The squire’s family evidently preserved the pre-Reformation inscription on the church (see church).”

[WHB – The relationship to the Charlwood Sanders/Saunders family to my ancestral lines has not been established. However, it is interesting that a recurring theme of my ancestral lines, both paternal and maternal, is refusal to accept state-mandated religious thought.]

______________

From History of England Under Henry the Fourth: 1399-1404, by James Hamilton Wylie

“Through the enterprise of John Stevens and Thomas Saunders, two captains from the Port of Bristol, they were kept fairly supplied with provisions, and were able yet to hold out. Foiled in his attempt to capture Harlech [Castle in Northeast Merionethshire], [the Welsh rebel] Owen [Glendower] himself went to the spot and opened further negociations [sic] with the little garrison.”

[WHB – That Thomas Saunders was a king’s man at a time when the English King (at this time, Henry IV) claimed Normandie and much of Western France suggests that at least this Saunders line is French Norman. This is not inconsistent with the y-chromosome evidence.]

_______________

Brief History of Bristol as a Port from www.bristolfloatingharbour.org.uk

“Until the early 19th century, rivers were the most important means of moving goods and people around the country. Bristol grew up around the point where the rivers Avon and Frome met, a convenient crossing place at the furthest point inland that ships could reach by drifting on the tidal current.

“The earliest evidence of Bristol as a named place (Bristol means ‘Bridge place’) is about the year 1000, but the Romans had a port further down the river Avon at Abonae (now Sea Mills).

“The effectiveness of the port was much improved in 1240s by major civil engineering work to divert the river Frome and create a wide and deep artificial channel. This in turn enabled the building of the Quay, now Broad Quay, which was to become the harbour’s principal wharf right through to the 19th century.

“In the 1300s, Bristol was the second most important port in the country after London. Woollen cloth woven in the Cotswolds was brought to Bristol for finishing and dyeing before export to Gascony in south west France (around Bordeaux). Red cloth was prized particularly, and Bristol had a monopoly of this. Ships returned with wine from the region.

“At the end of the 1400s, this trade declined and Bristol merchants had to look elsewhere for cargoes. Bristol merchants built trading links with Spain and Portugal, the Baltic states, North Africa and the Mediterranean, but couldn’t break into the very valuable spice trade with the East.

“This began a period of exploration in search of a route to the Far East by sailing westward (around the world in the opposite direction). This culminated in John Cabot’s voyage in 1497, when he is thought to have discovered Newfoundland and the mainland of America.

“At the end of the 1600s, Bristol merchants broke into the lucrative Africa trade, transporting trade goods, including cooking pots and guns, to West Africa, exchanging these for enslaved African people and carrying them to the West Indies and America. There they were sold to buy sugar, tobacco and other luxury goods grown on plantations.

“For a time, Bristol was the main port in this trade but by the 1750s most merchants traded directly with the Caribbean rather than transporting African people; there were fewer risks involved in this. At this time, too, Bristol regained its place as second port in the kingdom, but was quickly overtaken by Liverpool and other new ports before the end of the century.”

_______

The Lord Mayor and two sheriffs governed the town of Bristol in late medieval times.

Selected Sheriffs of Bristol (those italicized representing possible ancestral lines):

1568: Thomas Kyrkland – Robert Smith; 1665: William Crabb – Richard Crump; 1680: Abraham Saunders – Arthur Hart; 1687: Thomas Saunders – John Hine; 1696: Francis Whitchurch – Peter Saunders

 

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Saunders, Crump and Related Families in 18th Century Gloucestershire

Selected Citations from Gloucestershire Notes and Queries: An Illustrated Quarterly, Volume 4 edited by William Phillimore Watts Phillimore, Sidney Joseph Madge

Mayors of the City of Gloucester:

1740 . . . 3, [1743] Lawrence Crump, upholder . . . 5, [1745] Benjamin Saunders . . . 1750 Lawrence Crump . . .6, [1756] Benjamin Saunders . . . 1770 3, [1773] Abraham Saunders . . . 5, [1775] William Crump . . . 8, [1778] James Sadler, Abraham Saunders

Sheriffs of the City of Gloucester:

1750 8, [1758] William Crump, Benjamin Baylis 9, [1759] James Wintle, Abraham Saunders . . . 1760 3, [1763] Abraham Saunders, Moses Randall, 4, [1764] Richard Crump, William Cowcher . . . 1770 Richard Crump, William Cowcher

 

 

 


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Saunders, Crump and Related Families in 16th Century Gloucestershire

Selected Citations from Gloucestershire Notes and Queries: An Illustrated Quarterly, Volume 4 edited by William Phillimore, Watts Phillimore, Sidney Joseph Madge

1541 Sepulta [She is buried] Margaret Saunders iiii die Julij.

1541 Seputl. [He is buried] Rogeri Saunders xii die Januarij.

1544 Sepulta [She is buried] Agenete Saunders ii die Augustij.

1546 Sepult Johanis Carter xi die Septembris

1547 Sepult Hugoni Saunder viii die Maij.1548

1548 Sepult Thome Saunders filius Johani Saunders de notterton; xxi die augustij.

1550 Sepult Johanis Saunders ssii die Octobris

1554 Sepult. Thome saunders ii die ffebruarij.

1558 Sepult Thome Carter xv die Augustij.

1561 Sepult Johanis Saunders fillij Thome Saunders xxvii die ffebruarij.

1562 Sepult Johnis Saunders vii die Januarij.

1562 Sepult Johanis Saunders Junio. vii die Januarij.

1563 Sepulta Joana Saunders vid. ssviii die Marcij.

1567 Seputla Alicie Stiles svii die Maij.Sepult Johanes Saunders filius Thome Saunders xxii die ffebruarij.

1568 Sepulta Agneta Carter ssvj die ffebruarij.

1574 Sepulta fuit margerye Saunders ix die mensis Aprilis

A.D. 1575 Sepulta fuit Marageta Saunders ix die Januarij.

 

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The Crump and Saunders Families in Tennessee

I have been in e-mail with Anthony Crump, whose y-chromosome DNA suggests that he is closely related to me. The Crumps, like several of my ancestral lines were found in 17th century Gloucestershire.

My proven ancestral name, Saunders, is also in Gloucestershire.  It is particularly intriguing that there are examples of Saunders and Crumps intermarrying in Great Britain (and also in later times in Massachusetts).

For any family historians with information on the Saunders and Crump families in Gloucestershire or any other examples of their association with each other to alert me at ffvsearch@yahoo.com.

In the meantime, here are some of the curiosities in the interactions between persons surnamed Saunders and Crump:

Clarence Saunders: Creator of Piggly Wiggly Stores

Virginia-born Clarence Saunders (1881-1953) created the Piggly Wiggly stores, the first markets in which food items could be selected by customers rather than be handed them by clerks.

Associated with an attempt to “corner the market” in Piggly Wiggly stock, as a  defense against a “bear raid”, he lost control of the Memphis-based  company in 1923.

Five years later he an Memphis political boss E. H. Crump backed opposing candidates for Governor of Tennessee.

Memphis Political Boss E H Crump

That campaign was associated with unprecedently vitriolic newspaper advertising by Saunders and Crump.

Edmund Holl “Boss” Crump

E(dmund) H(oll) Crump (1874-1954) was the undisputed political boss of Memphis and a major figure in Tennessee politics in the first half of the 20th century.

 

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Elizabeth Ann Johnson (1810-1879) Bedford County, VA

1810

ELIZABETH ANN JOHNSON, daughter of JOHN JOHNSON, JR and MARY ANN (POLLY) CARTER, born in Bedford County, VA.

1830

ELIZABETH ANN JOHNSON married JOSEPH BURNETT, son of JULIUS SAUNDERS and PRISCILLA CARTER, married. William Burnett, Surety. Married by Abner Anthony, December 23 1830.

1879

ELIZABETH ANN JOHNSON died April 28, 1879, Bedford County, Virginia.

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The Descendents of Julius Saunders and Priscilla Carter Burnett: Resolving a Genealogical Mystery, Part 2

WHB: I received the following e-mails, both from descendents of Priscilla Carter Burnett, who share my interest in determining the true relationships between Williamson Burnett and wife, Priscilla Carter Burnett, Julius Saunders and Priscilla’s sons William, Joseph and Christopher Ammon Burnett

**********************************************************

E-mail from Justin Crawford:

I stumbled upon your blog tonight in which you wrote that the DNA samples from descendants of both Christopher Ammon and Joseph Burnett are confirmed in the line of Julius Saunders. 

I am a descendant of Christopher, through his daughter Sarah Ann Burnett Hackworth.  About 18 months ago, I coordinated a DNA  test between two confirmed descendants of Christopher and Williamson, Jr.  The test sample for the Christopher line was from one of my cousins who is related to me through both the Burnett and Lemon family (my paternal side). 

The Williamson, Jr line was from a friend and distant cousin who lives in Bedford, VA.  Both samples were from confirmed 3rd great grandsons of Priscilla (I am a 6th great grandson).  The results were conclusive in that they matched one another!  We were, however, unable to find a Joseph sample at the time.

I’m very curious to see the Burnett DNA results as they connect to Julius Saunders.  It has long been assumed that my ancestor and his brothers were all children of Julius and Priscilla.  To further support this claim, my relatives and I were able to locate the grave of Priscilla within the Five Oaks Plantation Cemetery, where her granddaughter, Sabra Burnett Saunders is also buried.  I am happy to share with you all information you can use.  The DNA results of my cousins further confirms the claims by Williamson, Sr, in his last will and testament.

To find proof that I descend from Julius Saunders will be great closure to a long-standing mystery, which I have followed since my childhood.

My line is as follows –

Christopher Ammon Burnett/Orphy Jane Leftwich

Sarah Ann Burnett/Elijah Austin Hackworth

Virginia Catherine Hackworth/Thomas Meredith Newman

Allen Street Newman/Cora Lee Burroughs

Mildred Virginia Newman/Frank Lewis Hogan

Lois Jean Hogan/Roy Marion Crawford

Charles David Crawford/Tina Marie Goforth

Justin Dallas Crawford (b1979)

Based on information provided me by my great grandmother, Mildred Newman Hogan, I can confirm the burial location for Christopher and Orphy Burnett as well as Elijah and Sarah “Sallie” Burnett, in a private family cemetery, near Huddleston, VA. 

Within a short distance of the cemetery, there are ruins of a house which belonged to Christopher and Orphy.  I remember seeing the house about 20 years ago and have a map from a cousin identifing the location.  I can’t confirm at this time if the house is still standing, but plan to visit in the coming months.

 Looking forward to hearing from you!

Justin Crawford

Bedford, VA & Charlotte, NC

 ********************************************************(

E-mail from Jennifer Thomson:

I was looking at your website about the Burnetts http://vikingsandvirginians.com/2012/01/julius-saunders-1758-bedford-county-va/)  and I see that you were able to prove by DNA that Joseph and Ammon were siblings and NOT Burnettes.  I know recently a DNA was done between a descendent of Williamson Jr. & Ammon and they matched each other.  So it looks like her last 3 kids are full siblings and NOT Burnetts. 

 
Any way, the reason I am writing this email. You said “There is no doubt that JULIUS SAUNDERS, whose property adjoined that of JOSEPH CARTER, the brother of PRISCILLA CARTER, was the father of at least two of the three boys she had with her.”   
 
Problem though, Joseph brother of Priscilla was in Kentucky at this point.  It is most likely her father Joseph that you are talking of.  Joseph III, Priscilla’s brother, was in Kentucky by early 1800’s and I know of no proof of him being in Bedford.  Joseph Jr. moved to Bedford County by 1806 and died in 1812.
It is highly likely that her dad moved to Bedford to help her out.  She also had her brother John that was living about a mile down the road.  Both Joseph and John were living about 20 miles south of the Courthouse on Craddock Creek. (middle of Smith Mtn Lake today) Priscilla is buried in the Saunders cemetery in the Smith Mtn Lake State Park Grounds. 
 
I am descended from Joseph III.  
 
******************************************************* 

WHB Response to Jennifer Thomson:

. . . .  My point about Julius Saunders being a neighbor of Priscilla Carter Burnett’s brother is that it provides a good reason why the two of them met.

As you may know, the Bedford County authorities had sanctioned Williamson Burnett for wife abuse (which I think was unusual for a public entity at the beginning of the 19th century), so it makes great sense that she was living first with Joseph and then with his neighbor Julius at the time that Williamson, Joseph and Ammon were born.
Jennifer Thomson’s Response to WHB:
. . . My thing was just that her brother Joseph did not live in Bedford. Her dad Joseph and brother John did. There may have been other siblings there too.  Just want to make sure you knew which generation you were talking about. . . 
WHB – There is very useful information in the e-mails from Justin Crawford and Jennifer Thomson. To sort it out, it might be well to concentrate diear on these Bedford County families in the first decade of the 19th century, when Priscilla Carter Burnett bore the children William, Joseph and Christopher Ammon.
 
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The Descendents of Julius Saunders and Priscilla Carter Burnett: Resolving a Genealogical Mystery, Part 1

Note from WHB – Documents from the 1820s and 1830s regarding the marriage of Williamson Burnett and PRISCILLA CARTER have perplexed genealogists. The last three children, supposedly of the marriage – William/Williamson, JOSEPH and Christopher Ammon – were disinherited by Williamson, whose will asserted that JOSEPH and Christopher were not even conceived at a time when PRISCILLA lived in Williamson’s house and shared his bed.

However, the entire Bedford County establishment as well as the eldest son of Williamson Burnett (James H) testified to the federal government that PRISCILLA lived with Williamson continuously until his death and that she was entitled to the Revolutionary War Widow’s pension for which she was applying.

The Sons of the American Revolution in the 21st century is known to have rejected an application from a cousin who was a descendent of one of Priscilla’s sons who was applying through Williamson’s war record (although he was admitted when he changed his application to apply through Priscilla’s father’s war record).

I had initially prepared some arguments on my cousin’s behalf of why Williamson’s disinheritance should be disregarded, so was open to either possibility.

All of Williamson’s male children have had many male descedents, so I had assumed that taking the y-chromosome test could yield important information, including a confirmation that at least Joseph’s line was descended from Williamson. Instead, I discovered that JOSEPH’S line was descended from JULIUS SAUNDERS and that one of JULIUS’ sons was JOSEPH’s half-brother.

When I published this information on the vikingsandvirginians.com website, I was contacted by a descendent of JOSEPH BURNETT’s younger brother, Christopher Ammon Burnett. He had taken the same y-chromosome test with similar results.

Meanwhile, others were working on this mystery and a descendent of William/Williamson, my ancestor JOSEPH’s older brother, and one of Christopher Ammon, my ancestor’s younger brother discovered they had the same y-chromosome.

Having come across my evidence, we are now zeroing in on final confirmation that all three of PRISCILLA’s sons who were indentured in 1820 to JULIUS SAUNDERS have the same y-chromosome.

Now that the DNA evidence has resolved the mystery, I think it is now time to re-examine all that is known about the situation. The result could give us a better understanding of this extended Bedford County family and even sociological and psychological insights into PRISCILLA, who is the director ancestor of so many people living today.

 

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Speculations of the Origins of the Virginia Suddarth Families

[WHB: Some family historians have suggested relationships resulting from marriages between the families of Suddarth, Ellgey (or Ellzey), and Travis  (Travers or Traverse) without providing documentation or even a convincing hypothetical explanation of how they may be related. The existing records of Stafford County, Virginia are scanty and fragmentary, and the idea that at least the Suddarths were descended from French Huguenots that settled in North England or Scotland after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes is, I  believe, inadequately defended. That said, I think there may be some substance in the speculations. I believe that it might be useful to list some genealogical studies and some selected known documents that might be relevant chronologically. The following attempts to do so.]

 1658

From William Suddarth of Stafford County & Albemarle County, Virginia, printed by Richard D. Hirtzel, 1999:

 “In 1648, a James Sudward, with various spellings of his surname, migrated with his wife Mary and daughter Elizabeth to the colony of Maryland. James was not indentured and he transported his wife. Probably they were from England. A few years later, James was in Virginia and summoned back to Maryland for a court action. His location in Virginia was not provided, and there is no basis for knowing that he was in Stafford County. The population of the colonies was sparse at that time, and James had some legal reasons to be located other than in Maryland. No further records of the family have been found after the 1760s in Maryland. So the possibility exists that he may have settled in Virginia. He would have been of an age to be the father of the first Lawrence Suddarth in Stafford County, Virginia. For this reason, the records available on his activities in Maryland are included in this booklet.”

1691

” . . .  The first Suddarth of record [in Stafford County, VA] was Lawrence Suddarth, who served on a jury in 1691 and is found on other records over the next two decades. In later generations, there were several other men with the name of Lawrence Suddarth. This suggests the possibility that the senior Lawrence Suddarth was the patriaarch of the Suddarth family in Stafford County, and that later persons with the same name were his descendents. The early American records provide enough information to suggest relationships with other persons, but frequently not enough to actually document the speculation that naturally arises from the ages and locations of these early settlers.”

1723

Stafford County Quit Rent roll

Thomas Ellzey 518

John Elszey 150 [folio 4]

William Purlow 150 Part of Henry Filkin’s land, Refuseth … S [mutilated – several lines lost]

Rawleigh Travers 3525 Paid 362 lbs tobacco – in part Due 484 lbs Tobacco

1724

Tenders of Tobacco for Overwharton Parish

Virginia State Library, Archive Colonial Papers, folder 52, no 34 (list 1)

Several “Purlers”

At Mr John Fitzhugh’s Quarters: William Travis + James, ___, Alice Parker, 4 Negroes (7  20,270)

A list of the tithables allowed to end tobacco and quantity of plants in the preceincts between Aquia and Quantico [Creeks] viz.]

1724

A list of Tobacco Tenders from the South Side of Potomack [Creek] to y3 Lower End of Overwharton Parish

John Travis (21,102), Nathaniel Morgan, Owen Sullivant, Thomas Handeman, 6 Negroes

Lewis Elzey’s Quarter (19,469) John Smith, Joseph Waugh, 4 Negroes, 1 Negro boy

South Side of Potomack

Henry Suddarth (154 plants)

John Elzey (50 plants)

1728

Land Patents an d Grants of  Hanover County, Virginia (1721-1800), compiled by Charles P. Blunt IV.

Hanover County Deeds, Book 13, page 467,

“Christopher Clark of Hanover County, Gentleman (28 September 1728) 1, 326 acres . . . on both sides of North East Creek . . . by Sudeth’s path . .  branch of dirty Swamp”

1742

Quit Rent Roll, p. 1

Elzey, Thomas

Elzey, Lewis

Mills, Willliam 100 acres 0 lb 2 s 0 d.

Source: Virginia State Library Archives Division, Miscellaneous Reel 444b [Stafford County Quitrent Roll 1729; Original in Huntington Library (Brock Collection BR 297(2) San Marino, California

Quit Rent Rolls, p. 2

Scott, Rev Mr James 9,354 acres 9LB 7s d.

Suddart, Robert 150 acres 0 LB 3s 0d.

Suddart, Henry

Traverse, Rawleigh 3300 3 LB 6s 0d.

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